Zagreb

Zagreb

Things to do - general

 

Zagreb story

The elegant and doughty Croatian capital Zagreb is becoming one of the most popular European city break destinations. With an eclectic mix of the Central European and Mediterranean lifestyles, Zagreb pairs well the Austro-Hungarian tradition and the warm Southern flavour. The most important cultural institutions in Zagreb and many hotels, of which a large part is within the international hotel chains, are located in the pedestrian area which is – when time permits – probably Europe’s largest outdoor café. There are also other attractions such as the picturesque open-air market – one of the last in Europe, which is absolutely first-class experience for all who come to Zagreb.

Sometimes serious, sometimes fun, sometimes unusual, this perfect size metropolis provides a real choice of things to do and see. With its cultural mix, stunning architecture, an incredible number of green spaces, world class museums, a restaurant and bar scene for all budgets and a wide range of accommodation choices, Zagreb is a city that reaches out and grabs you to its heart with something for everyone. The journey through Zagreb is always captivating, but the biggest value of this city is its atmosphere and the people who never allow you to feel alone. Zagreb has a story to tell and it has a heart, a big one!

Find more info about Zagreb at www.infozagreb.hr .

Country Zagreb
Location

Zagreb is situated in continental central Croatia, at the southern slopes of the Medvednica mountain and along the Sava river.

Population790.017 (2011.)
Area (km2)641

Culture and History

Today's Zagreb has grown out of two medieval settlements that for centuries developed on neighbouring hills. The first written mention of the city dates from 1094, when a diocese was founded on Kaptol, while in 1242, neighbouring Gradec was proclaimed a free and royal city. Both the settlements were surrounded by high walls and towers, remains of which are still preserved.

During the Turkish onslaughts on Europe, between the 14th and 18th centuries, Zagreb was an important border fortress. The Baroque reconstruction of the city in the 17th and 18th centuries changed the appearance of the city. The old wooden houses were demolished, opulent palaces, monasteries and churches were built. The many trade fairs, the revenues from landed estates and the offerings of the many craft workshops greatly contributed to the wealth of the city.

Affluent aristocratic families, royal officials, church dignitaries and rich traders from the whole of Europe moved into the city. Schools and hospitals were opened, and the manners of European capitals were adopted. The city outgrew its medieval borders and spread to the lowlands. The first parks and country houses were built. Zagreb confirmed its position as the administrative, cultural and economic centre of Croatia.

When Kaptol, Gradec and the surrounding settlements were administratively combined into the integrated city of Zagreb in 1850, the development accelerated still more. The disastrous earthquake of 1880 sparked off the reconstruction and modernization of many shabby neighbourhoods and buildings. Prestigious public buildings were erected, parks and fountains were made, and transportation and other infrastructures were organized.

In the 19th century the population increased tenfold. The twentieth century brought the Secession style to Zagreb. The city lived in the plenty of a civil society, with firm links with all the central European centres. With an increase in wealth and industry from the 1960s on, the city spread out over the wide plains alongside the Sava River, where a new, contemporary business city has develop.

Unfortunately there are no accommodations at this location at the moment.

Unfortunately there are no tour offers at this location at the moment.

Unfortunately there are no cruise offers at this location at the moment.